Tag Archives: brian davison tampa

Tips for Spotting a Desperate Seller
With fewer homes on the market, it is still a seller’s paradise. They can choose from a variety of offers until they find the best one. This might lead one to believe that the seller still has the advantage. However, there does seem to be a few sellers out there who are desperate to sell their property as fast as they can. When buyers come across this type of seller, the advantage suddenly shifts in their favor. Of course knowing how to find or spot this type of seller isn’t always easy.  Look for terms like, “priced to sell,” “quick close,” or “seller relocating,” to provide you with some clues as to the buyer’s state of mind. If you are looking to find a good deal or a desperate seller, start by searching for properties that have been on the market for a long time. The longer...
Monthly Mortgage Payments Versus Monthly Rent
Not so long ago, the housing market ballooned so high that monthly mortgage prices were much higher than monthly rental prices. This disparity hasn’t been seen since the early 80s. Typically, as mortgage rates rise, rent prices also rise along a normal rate of disparity. These rates allow buyers or renters to decide whether they can afford the monthly mortgage rate, or would be better off with just renting a home. Usually, the mortgage rate will be higher than the rental rate. However, after the housing market crashed, mortgage rates fell so sharply that they were actually lower than the average rental rate. With so many calamities in the housing marketing, especially the high rate of foreclosures, many potential buyers opted to pay higher rents. The scary prospect of trying to own a home, alongside the risk of foreclosure, forced people to become or stay renters. However, the...
Boomerang Buyers Returning After Foreclosures
Chances are if you asked the estimated 5.3 million people who lost their homes during the real estate crisis if they thought they would ever be able to own a home again, their answer would probably be no. Seven years later, however, with their credit rebuilt or on the mend, some of these same former homeowners are re-entering the market. The comeback being staged by this category, also known as the boomerang buyer, is being driven by rising rents and a desire to own a home again now that the economy seems to be stabilizing. Experts see this growing trend happening in various markets across the country, with the most popular being Riverside-San Bernardino, California (4.1%), Los Angeles, California (3.7%) and Phoenix, Arizona (3.6%). Since California is one of the biggest indicators and predictors of what will happen in the housing market, this is good news...
The Influence of Buyers & Sellers on Supply & Demand
No matter what industry you look at, supply and demand always plays a large role. This is especially true of real estate and home prices. When there is a large inventory of homes for sale, pricing declines, while a lack of inventory will drive up pricing. This is usually how supply and demand works. However, there are times when a large supply of highly desirable inventory is paired with a large demand. When this happens, pricing may also rise. There are many factors that can play into this, such as the location of the homes. The more desirable an area, the more people will want to buy a home there, and even if there is a large amount of inventory, there will still be competition to buy the best of that inventory. Another influence on supply and demand in the housing market is the type of people...
Foreclosures are Still Selling in Tampa
Conventional housing prices might be on the rise, but according to RealtyTrac’s Year-End 2013 U.S. Residential & Foreclosure Sales Report, foreclosed or distressed homes still account for more than one in four of all home sales. One of the states where this definitely holds true is in Florida and more specifically in the Tampa/St. Petersburg/Clearwater area. In fact, Florida still leads the nation in foreclosures. In the Tampa area this means that about 30% of all homes for sale are priced 40% less than traditional properties. Since the process to sell a foreclosed home in Florida also involves the court system, the selling process is delayed, which has become a growing concern among the lenders and banks who possess these homes, especially as the housing market recovers and the number of foreclosures in other parts of the country decreases. The good new is that like most other cities...
There Goes the Neighborhood?
“We’ve seen the shift from the time we first moved in here from 2009 to now. The neighborhood is already declining.” 30-something mom and homeowner’s board member, Brooklyn, New York They block school buses and garbage trucks by parking on the narrow streets. Neighbors complain of hearing teenagers outside at all hours of the night. Fast food restaurant trash is seen strewn on the ground. What force could be causing this neighborhood devastation? Renters. “Homeowners are more likely than renters to do neighborhood maintenance, get involved with community groups and vote with greater frequency.” (Research paper, Edward Coulson, economics professor, Pennsylvania State University) Behemoth alternative real estate investment firms own thousands of rental properties in family neighborhoods. They believe that funneling money into properties that would otherwise be left vacant improves communities, boosts the quality of rental homes and affords moderate-to-higher-income families access to better quality schools. But these large landlord...
Where Have All the Homeowners Gone?
We’ve heard it before: “The 2008 real estate crash resulted in more than 7 million foreclosed homes.” But what does this number represent in real terms?  It means 7 million home owners whose creditworthiness has plummeted, leaving them unable to again enjoy homeownership. Where have they all gone? It would seem, to renting. More than 100 million Americans are renters. Never before in history has the business of renting single-family homes been more centralized, thanks to behemoth investors like Blackstone setting the pace. From individual investors purchasing just a few properties to multibillion dollar hedge funds buying thousands, the rental market has become big business. Multiunit landlords are enjoying access to bank financing at the same time that many homeowners – especially blacks, Hispanics and the under-40 crowd - are being denied. Is this a welcome trend? Thomas Lawler, an economist and formerly with Fannie Mae, stated, “Early buying...
You Don’t Need to be a Weather Man to Know It’s Warm Outside
To simply make the declaration that “it is warm outside” can be a reckless statement, depending on your audience. A person from Orlando, FL will likely have a different definition of ‘warm’ than someone from Juneau, Alaska. You need more facts than just the air temperature to best assess the situation and make a comment that fits the scenario. Recently, RealtyTrac LLC. released its recap of U.S. foreclosures for the United States, during the 3rd quarter of 2013. The report found there were 131,232 properties indicating a default notice, scheduled auction, or bank repossession during September. On the surface, this may appear like a lot of properties, or referring back to our weather analogy, “warm”. In actuality, we need to view it in context of where the U.S. real estate and mortgage industries have been over the past few years. This number actually represents a...
What You Need to Know About Limited Exit Strategies
Exiting the investment is one of the most crucial aspects of Trust Deed investing; it determines the net or actual profitability of the investors.  An investor should never assume or accept the primary exit strategy offered by the borrower or Broker, as in many cases it is the only real one for the investors. Remember the example on PITFALL #5? Well for the borrower the exit strategy is the development of the property for a profit, taking of the principle (for other uses) and Deed in Lue the property back to the investors to stop the Foreclosure.  The investors are left with typically an over-encumbered property (that’s why the borrower defaulted) to decide to take a principle loss now or wait to see if the future offers something better in market valuations. Solution: Invest in properties that have multiple exit strategies; improved properties that are rentable for cash...
What is a Loan to Own Underwriting
A common theme and industry standard in private lending is that the largest portion of underwriting is based on the value of the asset in relation to the amount of the loan (LTV) and is touted as the ultimate insurance plan for the investors – and if anything goes wrong; the lender will take the asset and recoup all losses based on the lower LTV.  For our purposes we will call this: loan to own underwriting.  Certainly the value of the asset is of fundamental importance to the underwriting as the value of the asset is the actual security for the principle.  However; this is a significant PITFALL in the industry as it manifests itself as the projected cure for any issue.  This form of underwriting almost begs for inflated valuation of the property and may ignore threats to the transaction such as; weak due...